Natalie Wise
May 2, 2011

Red Efts are a familiar site in New England in muddy, soggy spring, but the first glance of one brings excitement indeed! I tweeted two weeks ago that the Red Efts were crossing, as they make the journey from the muddy woods to the ponds. The Tudor family has long known this is a sure sign of spring, one of nature's many clues to us that winter will soon be banished for a few months of glorious Vermont summer.

Natalie Wise
April 27, 2011
'Twas the Night Before Easter and all through the house, not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse
The Easter eggs were hung on the willow tree with care, 
In hopes that the Easter Bunny soon would be there....

Natalie Wise
April 5, 2011
We've been busy-busy bunnies here at the Rookery working on our special, handmade Easter eggs that will be going on sale this week (tomorrow, we hope!). 

This cake caught my eye as it had some of my favorite flavors: bananas, pineapple and cream cheese frosting! Then I saw taht it was the most requested recipe in Southern Living Magazine history so I am guessing that some of you southern bakers might know this cake. It is divine and I am contemplating making it as muffins and not frosting it. The flavor is that good! Plus the name is so charming and I long for the hot summer days when the hummingbirds are hovering about drinking nectar. Enjoy! 

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Natalie Wise
March 16, 2011

We're very excited that the April/May (brand-new!) issue of Mary Jane's Farm features an article written by, Natalie, on Tasha and the Tudor Family!

I have been making this cake for years and it remains my favorite. The yogurt adds a nice texture and a little bit of "healthy" to it! My children love it and it travels well for lunches and snacks. It is also a very good looking cake for hostess gifts and brunches. I hope that you enjoy this as much as I do!

 

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Winslow Tudor
February 12, 2011

As January turns into February and the days become longer, Valentines Day approaches. Cards of an affectionate nature arrive in the mail or appear on the table, perhaps merely a prelude to the flowers and confections to follow.

Winslow Tudor
December 25, 2010

Over the years the clapboards and shingles on Tasha’s house have darkened from sunlight, rain and time. Winter brings a moment of rest and peace to the land, gardens and house as it sits in the quiet landscape. Christmas is here, as is a cardinal not indifferent to the sunflower seeds scattered around the back step and under the lilacs. Balsam needles and melting snow from the newly set up tree have been swept from the floor, along with bits of paper left over from wrapping presents now under the tree. Indoors everything is alight in reds, greens and gold.

Winslow Tudor
December 10, 2010

To the north of Tasha’s house where the bee balm blooms red in the summer and beech leaves rattle in the winter wind sits the old birdfeeder.  It rests atop a cedar post about six feet high, and has for many years, been the center of activity for chickadees, blue jays, and red squirrels. It was even used as a scratching post by Tasha’s one eyed cat Minou, who preferred canned sardines to birds. The feeder is a six by fourteen inch platform with wooden sides six inches high on each end and a glass roof, and there are even two narrow strips of wood running the length on each side to keep the birdseed from blowing away.

Winslow Tudor
December 8, 2010

Tasha was fond of chickens, especially the rare Spitzhauben breed. She said their combs did not freeze in winter, as they had a topknot to keep their head warm, and that they were especially intelligent. “The intelligence of small children and chickens is often underestimated,” she was fond of saying.